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International Journal of Computational Bioinformatics and In Silico Modeling
2013: Volume-2 Issue-1
ISSN: 2320-0634

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ABSTRACT   REFERENCES  
International Journal of Computational Bioinformatics and In Silico Modeling 2(1) 2013: 81-86

The use of technology in enhancing the learning experience of adult students in post secondary institution using Gambia as a case study


Nya Joe Jacob*

Division of Natural and Physical Sciences, University of the Gambia, West Africa.

* To whom correspondence should be addressed. Email: njjacob@utg.edu.gm

ABSTRACT

Among best-practice principles was the belief that the use of technology to enhance the learning experience of adults was of critical importance. In 1998, this was not tremendously surprising. E-mail and the Internet were already fairly well established in offices as well as in many homes. Students used computer databases to organize and access information. However, we were a long way from where we are now. Then, online learning was a fledgling offering by just a few institutions and providers. Most homes had only dial-up access to the Internet, rather than today’s high-speed broadband. And college applications were still mostly paper-based rather than online forms. The subsequent speed with which online learning went from a niche offering to one that is a common option within academia has been striking. The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) reports that in 1999–2000, only 8 percent of undergraduates took at least one distance-education (including online) course during the survey year, but by 2007–2008, more than 20 percent of undergraduates had done so. This more than doubling of participation in distance/online learning in eight years is even more remarkable given that in 1995–1996, NCES surveys did not even include the question about distance education. Since that APQC the American Productivity & Quality Center (APQC) benchmarking study, we have seen the kind of technological progress that many of us could not have imagined, including technology’s applications in postsecondary learning and degree completion. This paper is highlighting how these advances have changed the college experience and its outcomes; this paper focuses on some of the changes that occur for the nontraditional student. One of these changes is the use of online learning and degree programs specifically tied to career pathways, another is the use of online portals that recognize and document college-level learning from various sources, and a third is the development of online tools that help students understand the connections between and among current skills, degree programs, and possible occupations. These innovations are helping to highlight learning outcomes rather than inputs, and they are helping nontraditional learners access degree programs that employers value and that accommodate the schedule of the working world.

Copyright © 2013 | AIZEON publishers | All rights reserved

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Citation:Nya Joe Jacob (2013). The use of technology in enhancing the learning experience of adult students in post secondary institution using Gambia as a case study. Int J Comput Bioinfo In Silico Model 2(1): 81-86

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